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Saturday, 14 October 2017 / Published in Health & Wellbeing

Ten tips to weigh less

Tip Number One: Feed your soul with primary food. Friends and family, physical activity, spirituality, and a satisfying career feed us. Lack of primary food creates over-reliance on secondary, edible food.

 

Tip Number Two: Drink water. Most people are chronically dehydrated. We often mistake thirst for hunger. If you feel hungry between meals, drink a glass of water before giving into cravings. Limit liquid calories from soda and juice.

 

Tip Number Three: Eat a plant-based diet. Plant foods are typically lower in fat and calories and higher in filling fiber than meat, dairy, and processed foods, while providing loads of essential nutrients.

 

Tip Number Four: Chew your food well. Digestion begins in the mouth. By thoroughly chewing your food, your body will better assimilate nutrients; you will also slow down your eating. It takes about 20 minutes for your brain to register that it is full. By slowing your eating, you’ll feel full and satisfied on less food.

 

Tip Number Five: Eat real food. Avoid products with high-fructose corn syrup or a long list of unpronounceable ingredients. They tend to be highly processed, lacking the nutrients your body needs, and are often loaded with empty calories.

 

Tip Number Six: Do Not Skip Breakfast. Skipping meals causes your blood sugar levels to peak and dip, affecting your energy and moods. It can also cause overeating later on because you’re so hungry.

 

Tip Number Seven: Eat mindfully. Turn off the TV. Get away from the computer. Sit down and savor the food you are eating with no distractions.

 

Tip Number Eight: Get moving. Do any type of physical activity every day. Find movement or exercise you enjoy. Remember that you cannot exercise your way out of bad diet.

 

Tip Number Nine: Sleep, rest and relax. When you are sleep-deprived or stressed, your body will crave energy, causing cravings for sugary snacks and caffeine as an energy boost.

Ten Number Ten: Schedule fun time. Boredom and stress can lead to overeating. Make sure to take time to laugh, play, and participate in activities that bring you joy.

Saturday, 14 October 2017 / Published in Health & Wellbeing

Legumes are great sources of fat, protein and carbohydrates. Different varieties contain varying amounts of these nutrients, with beans, nuts, peas and lentils all having unique nutritional profiles. Although these foods are a staple of vegetarian diets, non-vegetarians can also benefit from eating more legumes. For example, replacing red meat with a serving of black beans lowers your fat intake while boosting your fiber and protein intakes.

Different types of legumes
Introduction

Legumes is basically a family of vegetables or plants that feature a pod with seeds inside it. These seeds are sometimes referred to as pulses or edible seeds. Legumes include peas, beans, peanuts, and lentils. The richness of legumes in vitamins and minerals is the top reason why legumes are commonly used in cooking or in making salads. Here are some of the health benefits of legumes that you need to know.

This group of plants are known as excellent source of both protein and fiber. Protein is found in every cell of our bodies. As the building block of human body, protein is needed in various body processes. This is primarily because protein is the second most abundant chemical in the body next to water. It regulates metabolism and cell division. One cup of legumes, as among top sources of protein, contains 33% of the daily recommended allowance (DRA) for women and 27% DRA for men.

Aside from protein, legumes are also rich in fiber. Fiber is essential for the body to balance the blood sugar and lower the cholesterol level in our bloodstream. It also prevents constipation.

Legumes are also abundant with vitamins and minerals, which is why they are widely used in soups, salads, and smoothies.

Beans

The most common varieties of legumes are beans. These include adzuki beans, black beans, soybeans, anasazi beans, fava beans, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), kidney beans and lima beans. These foods are high in protein and carbohydrates but low in fat. For example, 1 cup of cooked adzuki beans contains 17.3 grams of protein, 57 grams of carbohydrates, 294 calories and only 0.2 grams of fat. In comparison, 1 cup of cooked chickpeas contains 14.5 grams of protein, 45 grams of carbohydrates, 269 calories and 4.3 grams of fat. Because of their assortment of flavors and textures, a mixture of lightly-seasoned, cooked-then-cooled beans makes a flavorful, nutritious and filling salad.

Nuts

Some legumes are inappropriately called “nuts.” The most common example is the peanut, with other examples including soy nuts and carob nuts. Similar to other nuts, these legumes contain high concentrations of protein, fat and carbohydrates. For example, 1 cup of dry-roasted soy nuts contains 68.1 grams of protein, 37.2 grams of fat, 56.3 grams of carbohydrates and 776 calories. One cup of dry-roasted peanuts is much lower in protein and higher in fat, with 34.6 grams of protein, 31.4 grams of carbohydrates, 854 calories and 72.5 grams of fat. When eating soy or peanuts, choose dry-roasted and unsalted varieties to avoid the high fat and sodium content of oil-roasted, salted nuts.

Peas

A number of legumes are labeled as peas, including green peas, snow peas, snap peas, split peas and black-eyed peas. Similar to beans, peas contain high concentrations of carbohydrates and protein but little fat. For example, 1 cup of boiled green peas contains 8.6 grams of protein, 25 grams of carbohydrates, 134 calories and 0.4 gram of fat. Split peas contain higher concentrations of protein and carbohydrates but a similar amount of fat. One cup of boiled split peas contains 16.4 grams of protein, 41.4 grams of carbohydrates, 231 calories and only 0.8 grams of fat. As most varieties have a naturally sweet flavor, peas are great as a side-dish, snack, addition to a stir-fry or topping on a salad.

Lentils

Legumes that are classified as nuts, beans and peas are approximately spherical in shape. With their flat, round shape, lentils differ from this general pattern. Whether yellow, orange, green, brown or black, the nutritional profile of lentils does not change with their color. However, sprouted lentils differ from non-sprouted lentils in their nutritional content. One cup of uncooked sprouted lentils contains 6.9 grams of protein, 17.1 grams of carbohydrates, 82 calories and 0.4 gram of fat. As they are much denser, non-sprouted lentils provide larger amounts of these nutrients. One cup of uncooked, non-sprouted lentils contains 49.5 grams of protein, 115.4 grams of carbohydrates, 2 grams of fat and 678 calories. Although the non-sprouted variety is more common in cooked dishes, both varieties can serve as the basis for Indian dhal curries.

Thursday, 12 March 2015 / Published in Health & Wellbeing
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Dietary fat: is it good or bad?
The answer is both because not all fats are created equal.

The truth about Fats

Heavily processed, hydrogenated “trans” fats used in prepared, packaged foods can be extremely damaging to the body. They can compromise the cardiovascular system, immune system, and contribute to behaviour problems.

They can also lead to weight gain, skin breakouts, high blood pressure, and liver strain.
Many people are scared of fats, but our bodies need fat for insulation, vitamin and mineral absorption, and to protect our organs. High-quality fats can steady our metabolism, keep hormone levels even, nourish our skin, hair, and nails, and provide lubrication to keep the body functioning fluidly.

Where to Find Healthy Fats

Avocados, olives, coconuts, wild salmon and omega-3 rich organic eggs are great options when it comes to eating healthier versions of fats. Whole nuts and seeds, and their butters like almond butter or tahini are also very good options.

Note: Look for the highest quality organic oils when shopping. Words to look for: organic, first-pressed, cold-pressed, extra-virgin, and unrefined.

Avoid expeller-pressed, refined, and solvent extracted.

Eat Well! Live Life! Enjoy!

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High-quality fats can steady our metabolism, keep hormone levels even, nourish our skin, hair, and nails, and provide lubrication to keep the body functioning fluidly.

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Thursday, 12 March 2015 / Published in Health & Wellbeing
[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”yes” overflow=”visible”][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none” last=”no” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all”][fusion_text][fusion_dropcap color=”” boxed=”yes” boxed_radius=”50%” class=”” id=””]Sugar is a simple carbohydrate that occurs naturally in foods such as grains, beans, vegetables and fruits. When unprocessed, sugar contains a variety of vitamins, minerals, enzymes and proteins.

Refined table sugar, also called sucrose, is very different. Extracted from either sugar cane or beets, it lacks vitamins, minerals and fiber, and thus requires extra effort from the body to digest. Instead of providing the body nutrition, it creates deficiency. It enters swiftly into the bloodstream and wreaks havoc on the blood sugar level, first pushing it sky-high—causing excitability, nervous tension and hyperactivity—and then dropping it extremely low—causing fatigue, depression, weariness and exhaustion.

Today sugar is found in many of the usual suspects, like cakes, sodas, cookies and candy. But you will also find it in canned vegetables, baby food, cereals, peanut butter, bread and tomato sauce. It is often disguised in fancy language, labeled as corn syrup, dextrose, maltose, glucose or fructose.

The new study from Europe published on April 24 in the Journal Diabetologia says that drinking just one 12-ounce soda a day may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes. These findings agree with earlier studies in the United States, which found daily soda consumption increased the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 25 percent.

One of the most alarming statistics in medicine right now is the rate at which people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, which is far more prevalent than type 1. This news is especially heartbreaking, when we know that reducing processed sugar and eating a healthy, balanced diet can prevent the condition.

It is recommended that we get no more than 10 teaspoons per day, yet most people eat about 30 teaspoons per day—that’s three times the liberal recommended daily value.

When people lose the ability to maintain a steady blood sugar level, the entire human organism is affected.
If we are on a healthy, balanced diet, nourishing ourselves with milder forms of sweet vegetables, we don’t need a big sugar hit from a candy bar or soda to boost our energy level.

Healthy food choices (such as eating plenty of fruits and vegetables), daily exercise and weight loss can help prevent Type 2 diabetes, or slow the progress of the disease in those with pre-diabetes.

Eat Well! Live Life! Enjoy!

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It is recommended that we get no more than 10 teaspoons per day, yet most people eat about 30 teaspoons per day—that’s three times the liberal recommended daily value.

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Thursday, 12 March 2015 / Published in Health & Wellbeing
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Why organic?

Research shows that organic produce contains at least twice the nutritional mineral content than regular produce. They have far less dangerous heavy-metal residues, such as aluminum, lead and mercury.

They are free from radiation and pesticides. Many pesticides ingredients have been determined to cause cancer.?You are voting each time you buy organic products, you are saying to the farmers that I believe in you.?You are also making our environment better, safer and healthier.

Organic products are a little more in price but it is worth the money because your life is worth more. It will improve your health. Cast your vote for organic products today.

Eat Well, Live LifeEnjoy!

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Many pesticides ingredients have been determined to cause cancer.?You are voting each time you buy organic products, you are saying to the farmers that I believe in you.?You are also making our environment better, safer and healthier.

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